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Thread: Quantum Entaglement

  1. #1 Quantum Entaglement 
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    Recently I have come across the phrase "quantum entanglement" many times, it gets my curiosity going because of me being unfamiliar with it. Could someone explain to me what exactly is quantum entanglement?
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  2. #2  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catalyst View Post
    Recently I have come across the phrase "quantum entanglement" many times, it gets my curiosity going because of me being unfamiliar with it. Could someone explain to me what exactly is quantum entanglement?
    You will find a lot of hype and misinformation regarding this subject. On the other you will find a nice discussion in The Road to Reality by Roger Penrose. You will find a lot more there as well. It is a rather excellent overview of most of modern physics. Do not be put off by some of the references to advanced mathematics, you can skip that if you want to and still get a lot from the book.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catalyst View Post
    Recently I have come across the phrase "quantum entanglement" many times, it gets my curiosity going because of me being unfamiliar with it. Could someone explain to me what exactly is quantum entanglement?
    Quantum entanglement means that two or more quantum particles interact in a certain way, and then get separated afterwards, while maintaining some form of correlation. What happens is that, despite being spatially separated, they still act as systems and their quantum states remain correlated to each other. Take as a simple example two electrons - let our electrons interact first in an appropriate way, and then separate them. What you will find is that, if you measure for example the spin state of one of the electrons, the state of the other electron is automatically determined, even over large distances. So for example if you measure one electron to have a spin of +1/2, the other one will always have spin -1/2 due to the exclusion principle, no matter how far away it is, because they are entangled.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrRocket View Post
    You will find a lot of hype and misinformation regarding this subject. On the other you will find a nice discussion in The Road to Reality by Roger Penrose. You will find a lot more there as well. It is a rather excellent overview of most of modern physics. Do not be put off by some of the references to advanced mathematics, you can skip that if you want to and still get a lot from the book.
    I will try to read through this book, it seems interesting. Thanks for your reply
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