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Thread: String Theory: Energy strings and string collisions

  1. #1 String Theory: Energy strings and string collisions 
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    Hello, I was wondering if this is how strings in String Theory could work.

    speculation.jpg

    I was thinking that with energy strings, strings collide with each other to form particles as effects of the collision, where different points on a particular string where the collisions occur are where the particles are formed. This maybe explains the uncertainty principle and the reason for the unpredictability of particle locations.

    The are other things that I wanted to talk about, but that is what I wanted to ask about first. So, is it where strings collide together to form particles as effects of strings colliding together?

    Also, different forms of matter are determined by the frequency of the strings, where the collision of two strings with different frequencies form different forms of particles and matter.
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    The are other things that I wanted to talk about, but that is what I wanted to ask about first. So, is it where strings collide together to form particles as effects of strings colliding together?
    No, not really, it is the Strings themselves which represent elementary particles. In other words, elementary particles are Strings; what happens is that different states of vibration on a String represent different elementary particles - this is the basic idea, the exact details are actually much more complicated than this.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Markus Hanke View Post
    No, not really, it is the Strings themselves which represent elementary particles. In other words, elementary particles are Strings; what happens is that different states of vibration on a String represent different elementary particles - this is the basic idea, the exact details are actually much more complicated than this.
    Is this to say that such strings are of comparable size to, say, the elementary particles of the Standard Model?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Markus Hanke View Post
    No, not really, it is the Strings themselves which represent elementary particles. In other words, elementary particles are Strings; what happens is that different states of vibration on a String represent different elementary particles - this is the basic idea, the exact details are actually much more complicated than this.
    They are in fact so complicated that NOBODY can actually define what string theory is.
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    Quote Originally Posted by epidecus View Post
    Is this to say that such strings are of comparable size to, say, the elementary particles of the Standard Model?
    The elementary particles of the standard model are point particles -- zero size.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrRocket View Post
    The elementary particles of the standard model are point particles -- zero size.
    Oops, of course. It was a stupid question.

    Though this is a bit of a tangent relative to the thread, this part from the Wiki for "point particle" confuses me.

    In quantum mechanics, the concept of a point particle is complicated by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle: Even an elementary particle, with no internal structure, occupies a nonzero volume. For example, a 1s electron in a hydrogen atom occupies a volume of ~10-30 m3.
    Clarification on this and how the HUP relates?
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    Quote Originally Posted by epidecus View Post
    Oops, of course. It was a stupid question.

    Though this is a bit of a tangent relative to the thread, this part from the Wiki for "point particle" confuses me.



    Clarification on this and how the HUP relates?
    Quantum field theories model elementary particles as points.

    There are all sorts of problems with that, including the result that an electron should have infinite self energy.

    The plain fact of the matter is that the fundamental quantum theories of physics are neither mathematically well-defined, nor self-consistent. They are just the best that we have at the moment.
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  8. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Markus Hanke View Post
    No, not really, it is the Strings themselves which represent elementary particles. In other words, elementary particles are Strings; what happens is that different states of vibration on a String represent different elementary particles - this is the basic idea, the exact details are actually much more complicated than this.
    Well, couldn't String collisions be an explanation, since it would explain much of the uncertainty principle and even has connections with the E = mc^2 equation, however this may be incorrect.

    For example, what I am thinking is that when two strings of different frequencies collide, the collision points are what produce the effects of particles, which according the frequency will become specific particles. However, two strings can produce more than one particle, therefore defining a multiple particle system.

    Also, if energy is actually the strings themselves, then the mass defined by the effects of string collisions causes the existence of mass, where c, the speed of light, is the speed of reaction with these particles. The fluctuations of energy occur where there is a movement of strings, increasing the amount of collisions and amount of particles produced as an effect.

    EDIT: Making the clarification that these particles dissipate because they are simply effects of string collisions.
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreggSchaffter View Post
    Well, couldn't String collisions be an explanation, since it would explain much of the uncertainty principle and even has connections with the E = mc^2 equation, however this may be incorrect.

    For example, what I am thinking is that when two strings of different frequencies collide, the collision points are what produce the effects of particles, which according the frequency will become specific particles. However, two strings can produce more than one particle, therefore defining a multiple particle system.

    Also, if energy is actually the strings themselves, then the mass defined by the effects of string collisions causes the existence of mass, where c, the speed of light, is the speed of reaction with these particles. The fluctuations of energy occur where there is a movement of strings, increasing the amount of collisions and amount of particles produced as an effect.

    EDIT: Making the clarification that these particles dissipate because they are simply effects of string collisions.
    Two Strings colliding would correspond to two particles interacting. What exactly happens during such an interaction depends on many factors and is hard to answer in general.

    May I point out that String theory is a purely hypothetical construct, we don't know (yet) whether it can yield any real physics are not.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Markus Hanke View Post
    Two Strings colliding would correspond to two particles interacting. What exactly happens during such an interaction depends on many factors and is hard to answer in general.

    May I point out that String theory is a purely hypothetical construct, we don't know (yet) whether it can yield any real physics are not.
    Thank you for the information. I really have wanted to contribute to String Theory. I have been hypothesizing in genetics(written a book about it too), but after that I really wanted to get involved in quantum mechanics.
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreggSchaffter View Post
    Thank you for the information. I really have wanted to contribute to String Theory. I have been hypothesizing in genetics(written a book about it too), but after that I really wanted to get involved in quantum mechanics.
    String Theory is a very, very complicated beast which requires years and years of study to understand, and a firm grasp of very advanced mathematics.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Markus Hanke View Post
    String Theory is a very, very complicated beast which requires years and years of study to understand, and a firm grasp of very advanced mathematics.
    I can understand that it is complicated(especially since strings themselves are really complicated to grasp), but it is at least worth a try at best.
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreggSchaffter View Post
    I can understand that it is complicated(especially since strings themselves are really complicated to grasp), but it is at least worth a try at best.
    You have no idea just how complicated string theory and the mathematics necessary to even begin to approach it really are.

    Not only is the background both very broad and deep, but string theory itself is not yet well-defined and hence you will not find any polished, or even rigorously mathematically consistent, presentations of the subject.
    Last edited by DrRocket; 02-19-2013 at 12:58 AM.
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  14. #14  
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrRocket View Post
    You have no idea just how complicated string theory and the mathematics necessary to even begin to approach it really are.

    Not only is the background both very broad and deep, but string theory itself is not yer well-defined and hence you will not find any polished, or even rigorously mathematically consistent, presentations of the subject.
    I know it is complicated to understand that it is complicated(oh boy).
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