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Thread: Faux Qubit

  1. #1 Faux Qubit 
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    Hello:

    I have a basic understanding of quantum computing and transistor computing and have a question that I cannot find an answer for anywhere online. If you were to wire two transistors so that they were a pair, instead of being connected in successive gates, could you essentially have a faux qubit?

    There would need to be something to read it but in effect, the pair could exist the following states:

    1 0 - up / down
    1 1 - up / up
    0 1 - down / up
    0 0 - down / down

    Has anyone tried anything like this?

    -Marc
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  2. #2  
    KJW
    KJW is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sundermeyer View Post
    I have a basic understanding of quantum computing
    Hmmm. Your question suggests to me that you don't. What you describe is simply two bits, and a qubit is not equivalent to two bits. A qubit is a single bit such that the 0 and 1 states are in quantum superposition, which makes a qubit a non-classical object. Associated with the quantum superposition is a complex-valued probability amplitude that determines the contribution of the 0 and 1 eigenstates to the quantum superposition. Depending on the accuracy required, the specification of the probability amplitude would require several bits for the information content of the qubit to be classically contained.

    If one considers multiple qubits, then quantum entanglement of the qubits means that each possible combination of classical bit-values are in quantum superposition, with each combination having its own complex-valued probability amplitude. This means that the number of classical bits required to specify the information content of a given number of qubits increases exponentially with the number of qubits.
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    A tensor equation that is valid in any coordinate system is valid in every coordinate system.
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