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Thread: Narrow band light interference (?)

  1. #1 Narrow band light interference (?) 
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    Peace be upon you,

    The name is Yair, Israel, 26
    I build LED grow lights for a living/hobby *LINK REMOVED*
    I am NO physicist and my math skills are probably in the 10th grade ballpark.
    Please do correct my terminology/understanding if anything doesn't coincide with the truth.

    To the point,
    I generally use 4 wavelengths (nm) of LEDs in my lamps - 660, 620, 440, 400
    Each LED diode is outfitted with a 120 degree lens.
    If I place 2 diodes of 440nm and 660nm, 1cm apart, where their beams cross, will I get only these 2 wavelengths on a spectrometer (which I don't own) or will there be a "blend" of some sort.

    Thanks in advance!

    Love peace and unity,
    Yair
    Last edited by Markus Hanke; 06-18-2014 at 07:50 AM.
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  2. #2  
    btr
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    You will have the two wavelengths separately, if you use a spectrometer (or diffraction grating, or prism).
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  3. #3  
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    Quote Originally Posted by btr View Post
    You will have the two wavelengths separately, if you use a spectrometer (or diffraction grating, or prism).
    Thank you!
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