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Thread: Higgs field polarity and galaxy spin

  1. #1 Higgs field polarity and galaxy spin 
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    It is postulated that the Higgs Energy Field Permeates the entire universe.

    Could it be further postulated that the Higgs field imparts a spin to any masses it might encounter inducing spins on solar systems/galaxies/galaxy cluster based on the local polarity of the Higgs field and something akin to the "right hand rule".
    Would a polarity map of the Higgs Field (inferred from the spins of all the known galaxies) tell us anything about the nature of this energy throughout the universe?


    A further postulation might be that the movement of large masses/ gravity fields through the Higgs Field imparts energy to these bodies ... for stars, enough to allow for fusion reactions, for larger planets, enough to maintain molten "innards"... an induction furnace type arrangement ... perhaps energy that in turn creates magnetic fields around those bodies??

    Higgs(mass*vel)==Evolt + magnetic component ... could we harness that in any way?
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    Administrator Markus Hanke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulogram View Post
    Could it be further postulated that the Higgs field imparts a spin to any masses it might encounter inducing spins on solar systems/galaxies/galaxy cluster based on the local polarity of the Higgs field and something akin to the "right hand rule".
    No, the Higgs mechanism doesn't work that way. The properties and dynamics of the Higgs boson are constraint and described by its symmetry groups, and as a spin-0 particle, it does not carry any angular momentum. Even if it did, it wouldn't "impart" any of that momentum on macroscopic masses.
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    perhaps not an effect on the macroscopic mass but on the gravitational field of that mass?
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    Administrator Markus Hanke's Avatar
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    perhaps not an effect on the macroscopic mass but on the gravitational field of that mass?
    Like I said, the Higgs boson does not carry any angular momentum, and has no influence on the gravitational field either, except through "generating" rest mass, which then becomes one of the components of the energy-momentum tensor in the Einstein equations.
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    Paul: maybe what you're looking for is this: Galaxy sized twist in time pulls violating particles back into line - University of Warwick research

    "Nature is fundamentally asymmetric according to the accepted views of particle physics. There is a clear left right asymmetry in weak interactions and a much smaller CP violation in Kaon systems. These have been measured but never explained. This research suggests that the experimental results in our laboratories are a consequence of galactic rotation twisting our local space time. If that is shown to be correct then nature would be fundamentally symmetric after all. This radical prediction is testable with the data that has already been collected at Cern and BaBar by looking for results that are skewed in the direction that the galaxy rotates.”

    It is easy to neglect the effect of something as large as a galaxy because what seems most obvious to us is the local gravitation field of the Earth or the Sun, both of which have a much more readily apparent gravitational affect on us than that exerted by our galaxy as a whole. However Dr Hadley believes that what is more important in this case is an effect generated by a spinning massive body.

    The speed and angular momentum of such a massive spinning body creates “frame dragging” on its local space and time twisting the shape of that space time and creating time dilation effects...."


    Also take a look at Was the universe born spinning? on physicsworld. I think the answer is no myself, but I thought I'd mention it anyway. And like Markus was saying, best forget about Higgs when it comes to spin.

    Edit: and I've just noticed that the previous post was on the 8th. Duh.
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