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Thread: Physics of a Game

  1. #1 Physics of a Game 
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    I am working on RPG game in my off time and I thought it be nice to use real world physics to determine the actually damage of the weapons and reduction of the armor. I have yet to make to the reduction part.Here is what I have and I hope you can help. Thanks for your time in advance. Please correct me if I am wrong.

    Hypothesis 1: Damage is done by kinetic energy transferring from one state to another.
    Hypothesis 2: Damage Reduction is the ability that an item has to redirect/dissipate/disburse/displace kinetic energy away.

    What I think I know:
    Kinetic Energy, Force, Heat all play a part (as well as Air Resistance and Temperature)

    I have the used the following Examples to try and get a viable number but I can't seem to make sense of it.

    Bolt Action Rifle Bullet (Original)
    Mass: .28 kg
    Velocity: 933.29 m/s
    Distance: 47.72 m
    Kinetic Energy: 121,944.2314 joules
    Force: 261.3212 newtons

    Navy Rail Gun Projectile (I am sure Temperature has something to do here)
    Mass: 11.7934 kg
    Velocity: 3,833.505688 m/s
    Distance: 1 km
    Kinetic Energy: 86,656,522.5462 joules
    Force: 45,210.0660 newtons


    Long Sword
    Mass: 1.8 kg
    Velocity: 9.144 m/s
    Distance: 0.3048 m
    Kinetic Energy: 75.2515 joules
    Force: 16.4592 newtons

    Am I completely off base in my thinking or am I missing something major? Thanks again for your time on this.
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  2. #2  
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    A rifle bullet is tens or hundreds of grains. Not hundreds of grams.

    Kinetic energy projectiles have extremely high velocities and aspect ratios. They are used to pierce armor. No good for blasting people to bits.
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  3. #3  
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    Thanks for Replying. What I was looking for was: Why does a bullet do damage to an object/person? Is it the shear kinetic force or is the transference of energy, is it both, or is it neither?

    Oops, the rifle bullet should be:
    Mass: 0.0028 kg

    So how do I factor in a single shot of the rifle bullet going 150 meters to hit a target with a volume of 1.01 m^3. I know there is a velocity of 933.29 m/s, I know kinetic energy, momentum, entropy, dispersal and impact all has factors.[I also know Heat and Friction take part in it some where also]

    So what would be the correct way to calculate it?
    Forgive my lack of knowledge, I am still learning.
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  4. #4  
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    Bullets.
    Military rifle fmj bullets are more "humane" The full metal jacket keeps the bullet intact. As such it pierces, goes through and through.

    A hunting rifle soft or hollow point bullet expands and fragments to kill instantly or quickly. They mushroom and expand upon impact. Creating deep penetration wounds, hydrostatic shock and massive blood loss. The entry hole is small and the exit hole can be fist sized.

    A glaser bullet is meant to completely disintegrate in the target and thus transfer all its kinetic energy to the target. It will not go through thus will not injure people farther down range. A head shot can result in the eyes blow out of the sockets.
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  5. #5  
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    Thanks for the info. But it is not what I am asking.
    I am asking simply: What would be the correct way to calculate force/impact to an object? What formulas do I need to be using?
    Forgive my lack of knowledge, I am still learning.
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