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Thread: Greetings from an architectural student, Sydney, Australia

  1. #1 Greetings from an architectural student, Sydney, Australia 
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    Hello forum,

    I am very interested in physics. It is my favourite subject, although not a career. I am into architectural career, since I am a very creative and artistic person.

    I have developed a very reductionist world view since the age of 16 years. Whatever I read, I tend to read very thoroughly and overanalyse a lot. I should take anything more easily than I do, including reading architectural papers and literature.

    Although architecture is a holistic and creative discipline and I am a very artistic, imaginative and aesthetically sensitive person, I tend to design architecture by virtue of very detailed, thorough and rational analysis amidst complex, subjective and nuanced issues, including social, aesthetics and cultural. All other analyses are straightforward and can be complex in areas of environmental, structural and material design aspects of architecture.

    Physics is a wonderful discipline where one understands the nature in an objective, unbiased and fair manner. It is the most measurable, although the most abstract subject. Yes, I am aware that physics is also a creative endeavour where people have to imagine and speculate a lot and form hypotheses. Maybe, I should have pursued physics or engineering as a career after all. (The main reason for pursuing architecture was that it combined art and science. In fact, architecture does not cover good, really abstract, deep and complex sciences whatsoever)

    A few purposes for reading physics a lot as a hobby include the quest for most objective knowledge and wisdom, to clear phenomena-related superstitions and biases, and possibly to extend the knowledge of physics and apply to analysing anything including philosophical and questions of truth. (Philosophy is my second favourite subject)

    Hence, after researching forums where I can discuss with like minded, rational people, I have found this one.

    Cheers
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  2. #2  
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    In reply to Azure7, re: your #1 post.

    Hello and Cheers! Welcome! What are your main interests in physics theory?
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  3. #3  
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    Hello Azure7 welcome to the forum. I am sure that you will find much to interest you. However if you are expecting objectivity and lack of bias you may be surprised.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerry Nightingale View Post
    In reply to Azure7, re: your #1 post.

    Hello and Cheers! Welcome! What are your main interests in physics theory?
    I am interested in everything, as I believe that physics is the king of sciences and at the centre of interconnectedness to everything, including what is understood under other disciplines.

    However, I am very interested in understanding the nature of technology at micro or nano scale, including integrated circuits and transistors - an area in which I struggled the most at high school. I enjoy and am very curious in physics at an abstract level. Abstract things, including concepts and examples, interest me the most, because of their many implicit or intangible properties that are a lot to explore. This is in contrast with concrete and directly observable things. I am also interested in areas where things are very ambiguous, perplexing and impossible to understand or imagine. Physics certainly makes me open minded by stimulating my imagination - to explore, as an architect, the frontiers of space and spatial cognition. Ambiguity is one condition that keeps me captivated and perplexed throughout. The other is multiplicity of things that are observed by looking at them through many different angles. The third one is the smallest scale, like nano or atomic, and how things are implemented or dealt with at that scale.

    I have found and recently used one open source physics textbook - Motion Mountain: the Adventure of Physics. However, my first impression was its lack of credibility and authenticity, especially in its use of metaphor of the mountain and classification of areas of physics likened to this. I am very disappointed and do not want to waste my time perusing it. I seek the most authentic textbooks, however, how abstruse or complex they can be - I don't want any simplified version, which writers make to appeal to amateurs. Although I am not doing physics, it would be nice for me to use very authentic ones.

    Cheers
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  5. #5  
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    Wow, I heard you Australians were laid back, but judging from the time lapse there must be time dilation going on!
    Cheers
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    Anyway, physics is my most favourite subject. Next to that is philosophy. As an artist by hobby, and an architect by career, I already consider physics the highest of arts, and architecture one of the lowest of arts. Music is somewhere higher of the arts than architecture, since it allows the individual to 'transcend' or experience emotions and ideas. However, ultimately, the truest art of all is human intellect. I always love to imagine how richly architectural human intellect is in itself.

    Does anyone share the same?
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  7. #7  
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    I don't know what you are exactly trying to convey.

    Would you consider mathematics to be an art?
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  8. #8  
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    Hi, I was talking about aesthetics, not necessarily what appeals to our senses, but also intellect. Yes, mathematics is art!

    When I was talking about art, I was making it trivial that was so irrelevant and not something to worry about or make an effort to understand.

    BTW, can anyone recommend me good authentic books, as asked in the 4th post?
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  9. #9  
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    Wiley: Fundamentals of Physics Extended, Ninth Edition - David Halliday, Robert Resnick, Jearl Walker

    Wiley: Fundamentals of Physics Extended, 10th Edition - David Halliday, Robert Resnick, Jearl Walker

    I am a physics student. I have four different textbooks and that is my favorite one.

    Also, I forget the link, but someone might remember where the Feyman lectures are.
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  10. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beer w/Straw
    Also, I forget the link, but someone might remember where the Feyman lectures are.
    You can download nearly any text you want at Electronic library. Download books free. Finding books I know the Feynman lectures are there since I looked them up a few days ago.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Physicist View Post
    You can download nearly any text you want at {link removed} I know the Feynman lectures are there since I looked them up a few days ago.
    I believe the Feynman lectures are still under copyright, so if that site does not have an agreement with the publisher, you are linking to an illegal site. That can expose this forum's operator to legal liability. I suggest you remove the link.
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  12. #12  
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    In reply to Azure7, re: books

    Read Einstein's works...and if you find ANY written material that can surpass it, please write and let me know!

    (have fun reading...it can be one helleva' ride!)
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  13. #13  
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    I am not a copyright lawyer so the site should take advice on this, but my understanding that reading online and relevant limited quotations do not infringe copyright. Wholesale downloading, copying and distribution would infringe copyright.
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  14. #14  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beer w/Straw View Post
    Also, I forget the link, but someone might remember where the Feyman lectures are.
    I have checked out Feynman Lectures at this website The Feynman Lectures on Physics Website.

    Richard Feynman died in 1988. I would like to know if physics has expanded following his demise, and whether textbooks and papers on physics subsequently written are as authentic as Feynman Lectures.

    It takes centuries to master physics, whereas university courses are structured to help students pass and prepare for the career. It is unwise to suggest that I should look for newer authentic resources, as Feynman Lectures are more than a lifetime to learn.
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  15. #15  
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    I wouldn't say its changed much at that level at all. It depends what your ultimate aim is though. The terminology moves on as language always does.
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  16. #16  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Azure7
    Richard Feynman died in 1988. I would like to know if physics has expanded following his demise, and whether textbooks and papers on physics subsequently written are as authentic as Feynman Lectures.
    Yes. Everything in those texts are exactly correct. Most, if not all, physicists respect those textbooks very highly.

    Quote Originally Posted by Azure7
    It takes centuries to master physics, ...
    That's not true at all. Where did you get that idea from?

    Quote Originally Posted by Azure7
    ... Feynman Lectures are more than a lifetime to learn.
    Not at all. You can certainly learn them within a short period of time if you put your nose to the grind stone and study them intently. It might be best not to start with them though since they tend to be over most students heads (since they have more advanced material such as a nearly complete course in quantum mechanics) who have never studied physics. I suggest a text by Randy Knight or Halliday and Resnick first. Once you learn those then you can move on the Feynman lectures since they're much more complete.

    However you can't learn everything from those lectures because they don't explain everything. No text will explain everything.
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