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Thread: College physics!!

  1. #1 College physics!! 
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    A motorcycle stuntman is planning to jump from one side of a canyon to the other. The side he is jumping from is 200 meters above the canyon floor. While the side he'll be landing on is 190 meters above the canyon floor. If he takes off at an angle of 30 degrees with a speed of 25 m/s, what is the widest gap he can safely jump across?
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  2. #2  
    mvb
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    What are the algebraic equations giving the vertical and horizontal components of the motion of a stuntman in free fall? List your known and unknown quantities. What do you have to eliminate from these equations to get the result you want?

    You might want to think a bit about where you want to put the origin of your coordinate system to make the equations as simple as possible.
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  3. #3  
    Junior Member tcrosa27's Avatar
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    This is a fun problem so I asked my physics teacher how to solve it. She said the we learn the formulas to do it in junior year (I'm sophomore) and she also said that you also need to know the mass of the motorcycle+stuntman so you can calculate the forward and downward force (or something like that).
    Saad Khan likes this.
    Science is the belief in the ignorance of experts.
    Richard Feynman
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  4. #4  
    mvb
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    If you ignore air resistance, you can get an approximate answer without having the mass of the cyclist. The result is close enough to see what is going on, although you wouldn't want to use it to plan a jump! The main reason I can see for postponing it a year is that calculus is required to prove the formula for the vertical component of the motion. You can find the equations under projectile motion in your book, or if you get the formulas for the vertical and horizontal velocities and accelerations yourself, I can give you the results for x(t) and y(t) so that you can finish the problem. Good luck if you want to try it now.

    ilovephysics & ihopeyoudotoo
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