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Thread: Need help with this circuit diagram.

  1. #1 Need help with this circuit diagram. 
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    Mar 2014
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    Hello everyone, I'm new to this site. I'm studying Bachelors of Computer Science in Pakistan. I'm not really good at physics. I have got a compulsory subject to study in this semester, "Basic Electronics". We are following 4-5 books for this course.
    I need help with this question. Can anyone explain this to me?

    What is the voltage across R1 and R2 when the switch is in position 1





    I know that it's very easy but I never took interest in physics in high school nor I got any good teacher which can help me make my concepts stronger.
    Thanks in advance for your great help.


    MODERATOR NOTE: Moved to "Homework Help".
    Last edited by KJW; 03-17-2014 at 09:16 AM. Reason: Converted link to image and added Moderator Note
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  2. #2  
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    Kirchhoff's circuit laws
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  3. #3  
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    Quote Originally Posted by aimi95 View Post
    Hello everyone, I'm new to this site. I'm studying Bachelors of Computer Science in Pakistan. I'm not really good at physics. I have got a compulsory subject to study in this semester, "Basic Electronics". We are following 4-5 books for this course.
    I need help with this question. Can anyone explain this to me?

    What is the voltage across R1 and R2 when the switch is in position 1





    I know that it's very easy but I never took interest in physics in high school nor I got any good teacher which can help me make my concepts stronger.
    Thanks in advance for your great help.


    MODERATOR NOTE: Moved to "Homework Help".
    The voltage across R1 is zero as in switch position one. There is no applied potential (voltage) from the battery. The voltage across R2 is dependent on the battery voltage and the resistance value of the resistor. (You have shown the schematic in position two, not one)

    Ohms law is you divide the battery voltage by the resistor value. This will give the current flow value in amperage. (I =V/R)

    Then step two is to use the equation V = IxR - This means to know the voltage drop across the resistor (in the case of this circuit it will be a negative voltage drop) you multiply the current in amps times the resistance in ohms.

    I have used V to indicate voltage - your school may use E but same thing. The voltage is in volts. I means current and as measured in Amps. R meant resistance and is measured in ohms.
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  4. #4  
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    Quote Originally Posted by aimi95 View Post
    Hello everyone, I'm new to this site. I'm studying Bachelors of Computer Science in Pakistan. I'm not really good at physics. I have got a compulsory subject to study in this semester, "Basic Electronics". We are following 4-5 books for this course.
    I need help with this question. Can anyone explain this to me?

    What is the voltage across R1 and R2 when the switch is in position 1





    I know that it's very easy but I never took interest in physics in high school nor I got any good teacher which can help me make my concepts stronger.
    Thanks in advance for your great help.


    MODERATOR NOTE: Moved to "Homework Help".
    The voltage across R2 is zero as in switch position shown there is no applied potential (voltage) from the battery. The voltage across R1 is dependent on the battery voltage and the resistance value of the resistor.

    Ohms law is you divide the battery voltage by the resistor value. This will give the current flow value in amperage. (I =V/R)

    Then step two is to use the equation V = IxR - This means to know the voltage drop across the resistor you multiply the current in amps times the resistance in ohms.

    I have used V to indicate voltage - your school may use E but same thing. The voltage is in volts. I means current and as measured in Amps. R meant resistance and is measured in ohms.
    Reply With Quote  
     

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