Notices
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Is the rate of nuclear decay dependent on phase of the moon?

  1. #1 Is the rate of nuclear decay dependent on phase of the moon? 
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    185
    Maybe not the moon, but the sun seems to have some influence.
    [1207.5783] Additional experimental evidence for a solar influence on nuclear decay rates
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #2  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    355
    Quote Originally Posted by Useful Idiot View Post
    Maybe not the moon, but the sun seems to have some influence.
    [1207.5783] Additional experimental evidence for a solar influence on nuclear decay rates
    Perhaps, but the paper is quite weak, as pointed out by folks like Norman (http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1208/1208.4357.pdf). For one thing, others have been unable to replicate the results. Jenkins cites data from an experiment in 1986 as support, but embarrassingly of the opposite sign as their own data. That sort of sloppiness undermines one's confidence in the team. I'd love for the effect to be real, but I don't think Jenkins has made the case. I'm betting on a subtle sensitivity of their GM detector to other, perhaps poorly controlled factors. Geiger counters are avalanche-mode devices, and it takes very little to generate spurious pulses (I have been fooled by this problem myself, so I'm sensitive to the possibility). Jenkins et al. were originally trying to generate random numbers based on radioactive decay, so it may be that the team does not have sufficient expertise to operate Geiger counters to the required level.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #3  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    185
    Quote Originally Posted by tk421 View Post
    Perhaps, but the paper is quite weak, as pointed out by folks like Norman (http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1208/1208.4357.pdf). For one thing, others have been unable to replicate the results. Jenkins cites data from an experiment in 1986 as support, but embarrassingly of the opposite sign as their own data. That sort of sloppiness undermines one's confidence in the team. I'd love for the effect to be real, but I don't think Jenkins has made the case. I'm betting on a subtle sensitivity of their GM detector to other, perhaps poorly controlled factors. Geiger counters are avalanche-mode devices, and it takes very little to generate spurious pulses (I have been fooled by this problem myself, so I'm sensitive to the possibility). Jenkins et al. were originally trying to generate random numbers based on radioactive decay, so it may be that the team does not have sufficient expertise to operate Geiger counters to the required level.
    What do OSU and BNL mean?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #4  
    btr
    btr is offline
    Senior Member btr's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Circumnavigating the photon sphere.
    Posts
    168
    OSU = Ohio State University.
    BNL = Berkeley National Laboratory.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •